RIP on Packet Tracer

Main Commands
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You need to advertise only the classful network number, not a subnet.
Explanation:
Lets apply RIP protocol on the following topology.


Now, we will follow the steps as mentioned in detail in the following article. i.e.
i. We will assign IP addresses to all the fast Ethernet and serial interfaces respectively.
ii We will change the state of the interfaces from down to UP.
Then, after we are done with the basic step. We will apply RIP protocol commands on both routers.

Configuration of Router 0 i.e. configuring both serial and fastethernet interfaces.


Configurations of R1


Assigning IP address to PC0


Assigning IP address to PC1





R1
In order to apply protocol RIP, we will write the following set of commands.

Router(config)# router rip
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.2.0
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.3.0
Router(config-router)#exit


R2:
In order to apply protocol RIP, we will write the following set of commands on R2 as well.

Router(config)# router rip
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.1.0
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.2.0
Router(config-router)# network 192.168.3.0
Router(config-router)#exit









Write all the commands in the same fashion as in the above screen shots and voila, we are done with RIP protocol. Another important thing here is that we will add all the networks that we are using in our topology. Here in this particular example i am just using two networks x.x.1.0 and x.x.2.0 so thats why i have added these two network addresses to the RIP protocol.

Now, you can check it. Traffic is enabled and you can easily send data from PC0 to PC1.





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16 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. Oscar Neil 1786@burnside.school.nz

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  2. This entry should be titled: How to not RIP in Packet Tracer.
    In this example RIP packets will be rejected, so executing "router rip" command on routers is useless. You can check that for yourself by filtering RIP packets in event list filters. The only reason this is working it is because of HDLC connection between routers. It will fail on ethernet cable. To correct this - the serial interfaces should be in the same network: 192.168.3.0/24. Router3 RIP should contain .1.0 & .3.0 networks, Router2 - .2.0 & .3.0

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  3. well , u r wrong sir. Just checked again. It does work perfectly fine. Does not matter if you use serial or cross over ethernet cable to connect the two routers. May b if u send me your exact problem, i would b able to help u with that.

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    Replies
    1. Nope. You should review your blog entry. Here let me visualize what you are trying to do: http://i.stack.imgur.com/O8ECe.jpg. Is that correct? Now tell me - why are the serial interfaces not in the same network? Is there any CISCO book that contains/explains that kind of interface configuration? Regards.

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    2. Check it out now. Yh there was a mistake. Network on both serial interfaces must be the same. Thanks for pointing out. I didnt realize it until now that i had uploaded wrong screenshots.

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    3. Router0 RIP should be 192.168.1.0 & 192.168.2.0
      Router1 RIP should be 192.168.2.0 & 192.168.3.0
      There is no need to "add all the networks that we are using in our topology" in to the RIP. Think.
      Imagine that your network topology contains 8 routers. Suddenly you are forced to change network of one of the Router4 interfaces. Now does it mean that you should update RIP on any router in your topology? No! You should update it only on Router4, so it can “tell” the other routers: "Hey one of my networks changed - here is the new network address!"
      So basically you type only those networks which are connected directly to the router.

      Also what is R2? There is no such device so please correct it, you should stick to Router0 and Router1 names. Finally, this: “Here in this particular example i am just using two networks x.x.1.0 and x.x.2.0 so thats why i have added these two network addresses to the RIP protocol.” seams to be outdated now.

      Be careful what you write! Specially if your entry is on the top of the Google search!

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    4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  4. The things you have explained these really make sense, I love this writing!
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  5. The things you have explained these really make sense, I love this writing!
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  6. Very nice post, impressive. its quite different from other posts. Thanks for sharing.
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  7. WONDERFUL POST USMAN. please could you also do an example for subnets?
    eg. 255.255.255.224 making 5 subnets.

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  8. Found some Cisco examples and templates in creately diagram community.

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  9. The things you have explained these really make sense, I love this SFP-10G-ZR

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